Press Release

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

A new bill could aid rainforest preservation by banning services or products linked to rainforest deforestation.

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

SACRAMENTO – Legislation to expand insurance coverage for children’s hearing aids passed unanimously out of the Assembly Health Committee on Tuesday evening. The measure, introduced by Assemblymember Richard Bloom (D – Santa Monica), would make California the 24th state in the nation to mandate such coverage.  

 

Tuesday, April 23, 2019
Asm. Bloom speaking at podium
Asm. Bloom listens to child speaking
Asm. Bloom listening to testimony
Sing language interpreter
Constituents in audience speaking
Asm. Bloom listening on
Constituent holding baby and speaking

Assemblymember Bloom and constituents testified at a committee hearing concerning AB 598 - Hearing Aid Insurance Bill.

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

April 12, 2019 -- A 2016 law authored by Santa Monica Assemblymember Richard Bloom that makes accessory dwelling units (ADU), or "granny flats," easier to build is headed for some updates.

On Wednesday, AB 881, which clarifies key provisions of the existing law, passed out of the Assembly Local Government Committee and is headed to the Appropriations Committee.

“Accessory dwelling units are an innovative and affordable housing that can help California meet its housing needs,” Bloom said.

“Cities that have embraced ADUs have built or permitted thousands of new units, while those resistant to housing construction have pursued loopholes and erected new barriers.

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Several major cities are now considering a so-called “congestion” tax, on the heels of New York approving the controversial first-in-the-nation fee on downtown drivers in a bid to ease gridlock.

New York state lawmakers earlier this month approved a congestion surcharge for drivers at all Manhattan points of entry below 60th Street, the culmination of a decade-long fight that began in 2007 when former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg began pushing the plan. Now supporters in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Boston, Seattle and Portland are considering following New York’s lead, in an effort to cut down on traffic and pollution and raise money for public transportation.

 
Wednesday, April 17, 2019

In a quiet neighborhood on the outskirts of south Sacramento, the property looks like any other on the block: a single-story house that could use a new paint job, a large front yard that could use a little tidying, a chain-link fence surrounding the lot.

The tenants inside have no complaints—they have a good relationship with the property manager, and broken things get fixed on time. But like millions of renters in this increasingly costly state, they say that if their landlord raised the rent, they couldn’t afford to stay.

State law doesn’t do much to protect against such a scenario. Because they rent a single-family home, they wouldn’t benefit from rent control even if Sacramento votes to adopt it next year. They could be evicted without being given a specific reason why.

Tuesday, April 16, 2019