News

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

SACRAMENTO — California may soon ban certain pest control methods that wildlife advocates say are also killing mountain lions, foxes, raptors and other predators that feed on poisoned rodents.

AB1788 by Assemblyman Richard Bloom, D-Santa Monica, would prohibit the use of newer, faster-acting rat poisons, expanding on a 5-year-old state regulation that pulled the products from shelves for retail purchase.

Monday, July 8, 2019

Last week, 20 potential Democratic nominees for President took the debate stage in Miami over two days to discuss everything from taxes to health care to foreign policy. Largely absent was one of America’s most pressing issues: affordable housing.

Housing affordability is a key challenge in communities across the country and should be at the forefront of our national conversation. A study from Harvard University released last week found that one third of U.S. households are cost-burdened, meaning they spend more than 30 percent of their incomes on housing. A Pew Study found that the number of rent-burdened households has doubled since 2001, as more and more low-income and middle-income families are unable to afford one of the most basic human needs: a roof over their head.

 

 

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Turning on the tap and getting clean drinking water is something that most of us take for granted. In larger cities with well-funded utility districts, tap water arrives on demand, around the clock and with a promise of safety. Most city and suburban water is treated to the highest quality standards before delivery to our homes and families.

Life is far more complicated for those who live in rural agricultural communities across California. Those residents—their numbers exceed 1 million—often can’t drink the water from their faucets. 

Access to safe drinking water for all is something that most Californians support. 

Monday, May 20, 2019

Assembly Bill 1788, which would enact a statewide ban on certain anticoagulant rodenticides—the type of rat poison known to climb “up the food chain” and harm larger predators—passed out of assembly and is heading to the California State Senate.

The final vote was 50-16 in favor of the bill, according to Poison Free Malibu founder Kian Schulman, and was presented by Richard Bloom, District 50 Assemblymember, representing Malibu. 

Friday, May 10, 2019

If your dog needs a blood transfusion in California, as my boy Leroy did last year, you might, like me, think the blood donor was someone’s pet. After all, as I wrote back in 2015, many states allow pet dogs to donate blood to help save the lives of other pets.

But not California.

Friday, May 10, 2019

A new bill that expands the prohibition of pesticide poisons in California passed the Assembly on Monday, days after the National Park Service announced a local mountain lion died in March due to ingestion of rat poison.

Assembly Bill 1788, introduced by Assemblymember Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica) bans the use of second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides, which are used in rat poison.

The second-generation poisons are considered far more potent than the first-generation compounds, and a lethal dose can be ingested in a single feeding.

Rat poison has come under fire because animals higher in the food chain, such as coyotes and cougars, eat the rodents that have ingested the fatal poison.

Friday, May 10, 2019

A new report from the Center for the Study of Los Angeles at Loyola Marymount University found that more than a quarter of respondents surveyed who identify as LGBTQ say that they or an immediate member of their household were victims of a hate crime in 2018.

The study, conducted earlier this year in the city and county of Los Angeles and released last month, used a representative sampling of around 2,000 Southland residents to conclude that overall, 73 percent of residents think different racial and ethnic groups are getting along very or somewhat well. The report noted that this number is down from a high of 77 percent in 2017.