News

Monday, February 24, 2020

California-based animal welfare activist Robyn Black wasn’t ready to say goodbye to her beloved corgi, Sir Winston, when he suddenly came down with an autoimmune disease six years ago. She told her veterinarian to do whatever was needed to save the 5-year-old dog’s life.

Black dropped off Winston at her Sacramento vet's office on a Friday afternoon. By Sunday evening, the animal clinic was running low on its supply of canine donor blood.

Thursday, February 13, 2020

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Some lawmakers and mayors expressed skepticism Thursday over California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s proposal to give $750 million to state-selected regional administrators rather than to local government to address the state’s growing homelessness crisis, signaling the Democrat may have a budget fight on his hands.

The comments were made at a budget subcommittee hearing that marked the first in-depth hearing on the proposal and came on the heels of a critical review by the nonpartisan Legislative Analyst’s Office, which said the proposal does not articulate “a clear strategy for curbing homelessness.”

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Santa Monica’s representative in Sacramento has officially voiced his outrage at the Astros’ cheating scandal.

Earlier this week, Assemblymember Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica) introduced House Resolution 74 to condemn the shameful behavior by the Houston Astros in the 2017 World Series. HR 74 requests that in addition to the penalties already imposed, the Commissioner of Major League Baseball remove the 2017 World Series title from the Houston Astros, impose penalties or fines against players on the 2017 Astros team found to be complicit, and calls upon the Commissioner of MLB to require Houston Astros owner Jim Crane to publicly apologize.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Wet wipes, those single-use wet tissues for babies and adults wanting something more than just toilet paper, are the scourge of sewer systems nationwide, according to several cities challenging claims that the products are safe to flush.

Legislation in California that advanced on Thursday would require products that cannot be flushed down the toilet to be clearly labeled as such. Cities including New York and the District of Columbia have also attempted to cut down on what manufacturers call “flushable wipes,” saying they can actually clog pipes and require costly repairs.

Monday, January 27, 2020

Assembly Bill 1672 passed one of the hardest roadblocks in the Assembly late last week, squeaking by in the Assembly Appropriations Committee.

Under AB 1672, authored by Assemblyman Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica), all disposable ‘non-woven’ products in California would need to be labeled saying that they should not be flushed down. Products covered under the bill include all disposable wet wipes and flushable wipes frequently used for infant care and by adults wanting a hygienic alternate to toilet paper.

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Cal Thomas, not a scientist, and like other conservative ideologues, loves to cherry-pick quotes and facts to support political ideas that naively pretend to be true. Recently, he attacked Greta Thunberg and her campaign against global warming by dismissing her age and comparing her presence to President Donald Trump’s showmanship. I guess that dismisses her facts. Then he presents quotes from a biologist from the 1960s as proof that she is wrong?

Thursday, September 26, 2019

Ms. Goode's forecast was spot-on. It's been six years since the bulldozers, scrapers and backhoes stopped, and the Malibu Lagoon restoration is a resounding success. The final of six yearly Comprehensive Monitoring Reports performed by The Bay Foundation based on detailed scientific monitoring data prove the Project wholly succeeded in meeting its goals, performance standards and success criteria, and requires no supplemental work. In other words, it was done perfectly right the first time and is finished. Indeed, most of the goals were already met by Year 3.